Folded with a Purpose

“I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well.”             Psalm 139:14

Origami2

A basic handicraft enjoyed throughout Japan by both young and old is origami (折り紙). Originating from the words ori, meaning “fold,” and kami, meaning “paper,” origami is simple enough for an unlearned novice or child, yet sufficiently challenging for the most trained expert. The goal of origami is to transform a simple piece of paper through a series of folds into a finished sculpture. Before it is manipulated into a work of art, all origami begins as a square sheet of paper which is sold in packages at most local stores.

Modern origami procedures generally discourage cutting, gluing or marking the paper, unlike older Japanese versions that permitted such actions. When Japan began to import ideas and technology from the West in the 1800s, the present style of origami gradually became common practice. This pattern came largely through German influence, which had its own style of art and rules connected with paper folding.

Japanese origami dates back to at least 1680 when it was briefly referred to in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku. Since then, it has evolved into various types, with some actually having moving parts. Another category is called “modular origami,” which requires assembling multiple origami creations to form a larger object. The practice of paper folding has even been applied to currency: “moneygami” converts ordinary paper money into intricate works of art.

Perhaps the most beloved origami model is the Japanese crane, which is traditionally associated with mythical powers of health, luck or long life. According to Japanese legend, the gods will grant extended life or good fortune to anyone who folds a thousand cranes. Literally hundreds of these thousand-crane-strands are typically hung in the atomic bombing peace memorial sites, representing a desire for peace and prayers for the souls who perished nearby.

The skill and craftsmanship required to produce the more intricate forms of origami is stunning, but it doesn’t begin to compare with the incredible creativity and power on display in the life of every human being on this planet. The psalmist marveled at the work of God when considering his own mortal frame and in turn responded in praise of His Creator. We were “folded” with a purpose, and that is to honor God in the unique way that He has created each one of us. We are His works of art, demonstrating God’s favor upon us.

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